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Welcome to the Roaring Twenties

About 20 years after Blogs started being a thing, I have decided to start one. The purpose is simple. To help and educate interested people about how to enjoy a decent return on their money from the UK Stock Market. In reading this blog, do be aware that is simply for education and I am not regulated. In reading from this point you are deemed to have accepted the terms of this disclaimer.

I started doing it in 2012 and it’s become a real interest of mine. There have been ups and downs, albeit thankfully the ups have been in greater supply than the downs. I have read and learnt a lot over that time, but crucially have been doing it since the very start. It’s had a positive effect on my own personal investments.

I was persuaded to write this blog as I’ve met quite a few people who are interested in doing what I’ve done, but are either too busy to invest the time or are daunted by what needs to be learnt. As a result I am writing to demystify and educate. I believe that with some tools and techniques that can be learnt quite quickly, it is quite possible to do well in the Stock Market.

When I refer to the Stock Market, I am referring to the UK Stock Market, to include the FTSE All Share Index and the Alternative (AIM) market. I don’t invest in individual shares outside of these markets. I personally have investment exposure to the rest of the world through a blend of Index Funds in my pension.

I do hope that you will be interested in joining me on this journey. It goes without saying that anything posted on here should not ever be construed as investment advice. I am not qualified to give this and anything posted here is in my personal and no doubt biased view! You should always do your own research and obtain investment advice that is tailored to your own particular situation and circumstances.

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